Balancing Work & Care

Real Working Carer Stories

Read about experiences from local working carers.

Like many working carers, those that have kindly shared their stories have found their caring roles have impacted other parts of their lifes including their professional careers. Many talk of the lack of access to or awareness of support within their workplaces; lack of flexibility; lack of support with carers assessments; and lack of communication regarding workplace support. These experiences highlight the barriers to continuing employment; applying for promotion and the impact on their wellbeing.

Crossroads Care Gloucestershire are working to ensure that working
carers experiences are heard. Sharing your story enables us to illustrate to employers the impact that the lack of specific support in the workplace can have on their working carer employees .

If you’re a carer and would like to share your story, please email lisa@crossroadscareglos.org.uk

Sarah’s Story

Sarah’s Story

‘It’s like simultaneously being in a constant state of flight and fight: like being a paramedic, an emergency doctor, and a policewoman all rolled into one, I have to switch between skills and roles quickly and effectively without training or support or a holiday.’
Lindsay’s story

Lindsay’s story

“I know people like myself don't consider themselves carers, because you’re husband, wife, son, or daughter and you just see it as naturally caring for people. I guess you feel like a carer when it gets hard when you feel it's a struggle.” “At my age now, you meet people and it’s often the case that they have older relatives to support with many more people living longer. Many of my work colleagues also have care responsibilities."
Kate’s story

Kate’s story

‘You can get a call at any time. That’s stressful when you’re at work. You’re thinking, ‘ what am I supposed to do now then? I’ve got to be here at work.” “Sometimes your mind is not really on the job because you’re working away thinking ‘ Has mum got this? Do I need to get this for her on the way home? The stress of it wasn’t considered by my employers.”
James’s story

James’s story

"No carer or parent likes to make a fuss about being a ‘parent'... or ever consider themselves a carer in the first place. Personally, I don’t think of myself as a male carer, however, it’s quite evident that, for those in senior roles across many companies, our situation is not the normal one. There have been issues in the past, but I find it depends on the manager you speak to. It has been said to me by a previous manager that I get put on too much by my wife and that she should do more, and, on a daily basis, I have had to explain why, as a male, I have to do various tasks at home."
Tasha’s story

Tasha’s story

"As a result of my employer’s Working Carers Network, a colleague told me about The Care Act, and it’s helped to know that there is something legal there for carers because if you don’t know your rights, you can’t fight for them. As a result, I felt more confident to ring the council for a needs assessment for my husband. I also asked for an advocate because the stress of dealing with all the different departments on top of caring and working was too much for me."
Sophie’s story

Sophie’s story

“My employer hasn’t mentioned a carers policy, or carers leave, nor have I sat down with the manager and been asked how they can support me.” “This is the thing; you don’t necessarily know the route to go down. My support was very much from people I knew.”
Rebecca’s story

Rebecca’s story

“I didn’t tell my employer why, I just said that I wanted to cut my hours down. The thing is a lot of people are afraid to tell their employer that they’re a carer.” “My employer probably was aware that I cared because my daughter was in the hospital, where I worked. But carers didn’t seem to exist, as far as work was concerned. Even when I had appraisals, I was never asked. I wasn’t aware of any support in the NHS for unpaid carers.”

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